Chapman’s zebra

Chapman’s zebra Equus burchellii

ClassMammalia
OrderPerissodactyla
FamilyEquidae
Size1.3m to withers
Weight175–320kg
Gestation12 months
Birth1
Life-span30 years
Diet
herbivorous

Habitat
savannah, prairies

Range
Africa (from south Sudan to South Africa)


Chapman’s zebras have thicker, more widely spaced stripes on their coats than Grevy’s zebras. They also have stripes under their belly, unlike other zebra species.
 
Females give birth to one young after a year-long pregnancy. The young are breastfed for about 6 months but start to graze at about one month of age. Chapman zebras form small groups of several females and one stallion. These harems come together to form large herds during the migration season.
 
Zebras feed for around 20 hours a day. They also need to drink every day, so they stay close to water sources during the dry season. In the rainy season they migrate towards pasturelands.
 
These are the only wild Equidae not to be endangered. The species is quite widespread and fairly common, despite certain sub-populations and sub-species being affected, to different degrees, by habitat loss, hunting and competition with livestock for access to pasturelands and water. Despite these pressures Chapman’s zebras are highly resistant, and in areas where they are protected, numbers can recover quickly after a drop in population.




Status in the wild (Source: IUCN)

  • Not evaluated
    NE
  • Data deficient
    DD
  • Least concern
    LC
  • Near threatened
    NT
  • Vulnerable
    VU
  • Endangered
    EN
  •  Critically endangered
    CR
  • Extinct in the wild
    EW
  • Extinct
    EX

In the zoo