Red-necked wallaby

Red-necked wallaby Macropus rufogriseus

ClassMammalia
OrderDiprotodontia
FamilyMacropodidae
Size0.9–1m
Weight13–18kg
Gestation30 days
Birth1
Life-span15 years
Diet
herbivorous

Habitat
prairies, eucalyptus forests

Range
Tasmania, Australia


Smaller than kangaroos, red-necked wallabies are mainly active at dawn and dusk. Generally solitary, they may get together to feed.
 
Females give birth to a single young after a 30-day pregnancy. As soon as they are born, the babies climb into their mother’s pouch and latch onto a teat. The young leave the pouch for the first time at around 6 months of age but go straight back inside when danger strikes. At about 8 or 9 months, they become too big to stay in the pouch but continue to breastfeed until they are weaned at about one year of age.
 
Wallabies used to be killed for their fur and meat, and also when farmers accused them of destroying livestock pastures, but species numbers have recovered and red-necked wallabies are now common and even highly prevalent in most of their range.
 
Wallabies are protected by law in most of the states in which they live, but they are still hunted down when they cause too much damage to crops.




Status in the wild (Source: IUCN)

  • Not evaluated
    NE
  • Data deficient
    DD
  • Least concern
    LC
  • Near threatened
    NT
  • Vulnerable
    VU
  • Endangered
    EN
  •  Critically endangered
    CR
  • Extinct in the wild
    EW
  • Extinct
    EX

In the zoo