Grevy’s zebra

Grevy’s zebra Equus grevyi (EEP)

ClassMammalia
OrderPerissodactyla
FamilyEquidae
Size1.4–1.6m
Weight350–450kg max
Gestation13 months
Birth1
Life-spanup to 30 years
Diet
herbivorous (grass, leaves)

Habitat
semi-arid prairies

Range
Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya)


Grevy’s zebras are white with brown-tipped muzzles. Their stripes are narrower than those of Chapman’s zebras and they are the largest wild Equidae.
 
Their social structure differs to that of other zebras. Instead of harems or small family groups, they live in more open societies without long-lasting relationships, except those between a mother and her foal. Dominant males defend territories over which they have exclusive access to receptive females, never leaving the group except during intense droughts, and then only for a few weeks.
 
The species is named for the president of the French Third Republic, Jules Grévy, after Empeor Menelik of Ethiopia gave him a zebra as a gift. The number of wild Grevy’s zebras is currently estimated to be less than 2,500. The species is listed as endangered on the IUCN’s Red List because of rivalry with livestock for access to pastureland and water sources, being intensively hunted, mainly for its skin but also for its meat, and certain diseases, including anthrax.




Status in the wild (Source: IUCN)

  • Not evaluated
    NE
  • Data deficient
    DD
  • Least concern
    LC
  • Near threatened
    NT
  • Vulnerable
    VU
  • Endangered
    EN
  •  Critically endangered
    CR
  • Extinct in the wild
    EW
  • Extinct
    EX

In the zoo